A new en-suite bathroom can look great and add value to your property – but how much is the extension going to set you back?

en-suite bathroom costAre you sick and tired of getting up in the middle of the night and wandering about the landing to go to the toilet? Or exhausted with sharing a single bathroom with an increasing number of family members? Then – if you have the room – why not think about having an en-suite bathroom installed in the master bedroom of your property?

Not only do these extra rooms give you some much needed space and privacy in the confines of your own bedroom, but they also provide constant access to additional bathroom facilities and make it easier for everyone to get up and out the house as soon as they need! Plus an en-suite can even be installed so it connects to more than one room should you so wish!

So what sort of things do you need to think about when planning a new en-suite bathroom for your home?

Planning an En-Suite Bathroom

Whether you’re having it installed as an extension or refurbishment, there are several things you need to consider when budgeting for a brand new en-suite bathroom, including the following:

Plumbing – will you need to have new pipe work installed before work on the room goes ahead? Will this involve lifting up floorboards and removing walls or plasterboard? Will you need new radiators as well as a standard hot and cold water supply? Waste water also needs to run downhill – so will this affect your exterior pipe-work and guttering?

Space – do you have the room for an en-suite to begin with? Most bedrooms should be at least three metres squared if you’re thinking of having an en-suite fitted into the existing space, but this could be a bit less if you’re thinking of knocking into an adjacent room or cupboard. Some home-owners are also happy to have a shower-only en-suite, or just a single toilet – they can often be tailored to whichever you’d prefer. A standard en-suite bathroom will be somewhere between one to two metres squared, and half of that space will be taken up by the shower tray – so make sure an architect or contractor plans how things are going to fit together before you sign on the dotted line.

Lighting – many en-suite bathrooms, upstairs or downstairs, are built in the centre of a property, and as such don’t always have access to natural light. Of course if it is adjacent to an existing wall on the property you can always have a window installed as part of the refurbishment, but if not there are plenty of other option to consider – from regular halogen lighting to internal, colour-changing spotlights with additional mood enhancers!

Ventilation – you will also need to make sure that enough fresh air is ventilated throughout the en-suite to prevent the build-up of damp, mould and mildew residue. If you have a window leaving this open regularly will obviously help to reduce moisture levels, but otherwise you might need to have an internal fan installed somewhere in the bathroom. For further information about ventilation guidelines you should read up on the Part F of the British Building Regulations.

Style – en-suite bathrooms are usually very small, so style and design is important to make you feel comfortable using the extra space. Warm, calming colours often work best in such an enclosed space, while sliding doors and a frame-less shower door help to keep things neat and organised. If you don’t like feeling too claustrophobic and cramped, installing mirrors and glossy, white tiles in the en-suite will also help maximise the illusion of more space.

Storage – finally, think about whether or not storage is going to be a major aspect of your new en-suite bathroom. If you’re taking up a large proportion of the old bedroom, then you may need to think about extra cupboards and shelves to house all your bathroom accessories – otherwise there’s no reason why they can’t stay in the bedroom on a dresser or bathroom specific-shelf, ready for whenever you need them!

How much will an en suite bathroom cost?

The average cost of adding a new bathroom to a house is around £3,000. However, cost of an en-suite bathroom can easily reach up to £4,000, depending on your specifications, materials and location in the house.

When you hire a company to build a new bathroom for you, in the quote you will receive, it will include the:

  • Labour
  • Fixtures
  • Fittings
  • Finished
  • Flooring
  • Tiling
  • Painting

It is recommended to build the new bathroom i) next to the existing one ii) bellow iii) or above, as this way it not necessary to avoid redirecting plumbing such as soil and waste pipes.

You need to estimate how many hours of plumbing work it will be required, to have enough budget, it is easier to estimate the cost of fixtures and fittings once all the plumbing work has been completed.

Bath

New acrylics baths prices start from £70 (low end)

High-quality steel baths prices range from £300 –£500

Cast iron, composite baths cost over £1000

Shower

A basic electric shower costs as little as £50, but for more stylish and functional unites expect to pay between £100 and £200.

Power showers prices start from £200.

Digital showers, shower towers, shower columns and shower cabins start from £500 and can cost as much as £2000, depending on the model that you wish to go for.

Shower enclosure

Investing in shower enclosure always pays off because it is used everyday and improves the look of the bathroom.

Shower cubicles prices range from £150 – £600.

Wet room enclosure

Wet room enclosures cost from £500 upwards.

The cost of a wet room in proportional to the structural work required (plumbing, waterproofing, shower and screen).

The cost of a wet room shower depends on the fixtures, fittings and tiling work required.

Basin

Ceramic basins cost from £50 upwards.

Vanity basin unit prices start from £100 but expect to pay £200 – £300 on average, as usually they come separate.

Toilet

For a basic type of toiler expect to pay about £50.

For a good quality toilet expect to pay between £150 and £300.

You can save money by buying together with a matching basin as a bundle.

Taps and hardware

Bathroom taps are as important as other bathroom fixtures.

Choose wisely as it can be an important addition and can me your basin look high end.

Expect to pay £20 – £100 for a good mixer and £400 for something high-end.

For more accurate price projections based on your specific circumstances, you should get in touch with as many different contractors as possible, and see if any will carry out a free, preliminary inspection of your property to come up with the most detailed quote available.

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