Don’t enjoy the winter darkness brought about by daylight savings? Then why not look into maximising natural lighting in your home before winter settles in?

natural lighting in your homeFor many people across the UK, winter is associated with daylight savings and the accompanying darkness that’s drawn across Britain each week. And if your home is already small, cramped and claustrophobic, making the most of natural lighting can be more and more difficult as the weeks’ edge closer to the darkest December evening. So how can you solve the problem? Well, obviously there is nothing you can do about the encroaching darkness – days will get shorter and nights longer year-in year-out, no matter how many improvements we make to our home. There are, however, plenty of ways you can maximise natural lighting in your property throughout the year – including some of the following:

Additional Windows

Having new windows installed throughout your property is an easy and ideal way to maximise natural lighting – not only can you control the light degree and intensity with custom-made windows or blinds, but you can also improve your property’s insulation with brand new double-glazed windows. As long as they’re kept clean, windows provide a perfect and ample source of additional natural light; the only problem is making sure the building is structurally sound before you have them installed. For further information, check out our guide to window installation and costs.

Glass Conservatory

If you’re garden is large enough, a new glass conservatory is a great way to open up the back section of your property and add a room that offers natural light all year round. Glass conservatories add a stylish, ornate feel to any home, while at the same time making the downstairs floor seem larger and much more spacious. Plus most conservatories these days come with in-built heating systems too – making it perfect to use all day long during the colder winter months. If you’re unsure of the style you want, check out our guide to choosing your own conservatory.

Glass Panelling

If a structural surveyor deems your property unsuitable or too small for additional window installation, then why not look into replacing some of your door panelling with glass panels instead? Most window fitters or handymen in your local area can get these panels replaced in a matter of hours, and just because you’re opting for glass doesn’t mean you have restricted your choice either – there are a range of glass door panels on the market, some of which include stained-glass effects and double or triple-glazing.


For those with a bit of extra cash but limited room – or if you’ve been refused permission to install additional regular windows – a skylight can be the perfect way to open up a room and let in extra natural light. Most skylights work by fitting a domed or flat ‘window’ in the roof of the property, and then using reflective technology to aim that light directly into the desired room – although some are simply flat or diagonal ‘windows’ installed into the ceiling itself (perfect for attics or loft rooms). See how many styles there are to choose from in this easy guide to installing a skylight.


Finally, if all of the above fails, why not simply increase the number of mirrors in and throughout your home? It sounds like a strange way to maximise natural lighting, but by multiplying the number of reflective surfaces throughout the property you are increasing the chance of natural light permeating the entire home – plus it’s much cheaper than a home renovation too!